“Be Bold to Make Mistakes”, first book written by Andrew Fan, Regional President of NU SKIN Greater China. Highly recommended by Ma Ka-Fai, Way Kuo, Stan Shih and Tom Wang. (November 26, 2014)

“Walk the way I love and love the way I walk. This is the way I do it.”
“Be Bold to Make Mistakes”, first book written by Andrew Fan, Regional President of NU SKIN Greater China.
Highly recommended by Ma Ka-Fai, Way Kuo, Stan Shih and Tom Wang.

November 26, 2014

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Starting as a naughty young master of a roadside incense store to become the Regional President of NU SKIN Greater China, in his first book “Be Bold to Make Mistakes”, Andrew shares his disparate growth and life experience. Andrew wants to tell young people not to set limits for themselves too early, not to decide their goals and dreams too hastily and, more importantly, not to allow others to make decisions for themselves because “everybody can walk his/her own way and make his/her own way”.

Andrew’s book will be first available to you at 2014 NU SKIN Academy. All NU SKIN partners enjoy a privileged price for encouragement. All income from the charity sale of the book will be donated to NU SKIN Greater China Force for Good. For more information on the availability of the book, please contact our Executive Partner.

A sneak peek at the marvelous content:

Dad and I were raised up by the same woman – my grandma Fan Li-kuan.  

At the age of 18, my newly married grandma moved to Hong Kong, a totally strange place to her, with Grandpa. In Hong Kong, Grandma gave birth to eight children, among them three died prematurely and the other five were painstakingly brought up. They were my dad and my four aunts. When it’s finally time for Grandma to take a breath and enjoy the happiness of leisure, my grandpa suddenly died from stroke, leaving two infant grandchildren behind. So my grandma had to take the responsibility for taking care of me and my sister.
By the way, my grandma was destined to be busy all her life. Every morning, Grandma woke me and my sister up at five o’clock. While we were slowly washing up with a drowsy look, Grandma had cleaned the house inside out. Then she would burn the incense and worship deities in front of the altar to wish for daily safety and peace for the whole family.
At six in the morning, Grandma would take me and my sister to have breakfast at a tea house. Coming back from the tea house, we would go to school and Grandma would then open her incense store. She opened the store before eight o’clock in the morning every day.
Grandma’s busy day started right after she opened the store. In the morning, she cut the trunk of sandalwood into sections with a saw and attended customers. She came home at 11 o’clock to make lunch. Then she went back to take care of the store while her employees had lunch at home. After employees finished their lunch, Grandma came home to have her lunch. Grandma got dinner ready at five o’ clock and closed the store at six o’clock in the afternoon every day. At nine o’clock in the evening, basically the whole family had finished washing and was ready to go to bed. Grandma led a life like this every day throughout the year, except for a few days off during Chinese New Year holidays.
Grandma had led a well-regulated life like this for over 50 years. And she strictly expected the same discipline and regularity from us in living attitudes. Today, I get up at five o’clock every morning and don’t take off even on weekends or holidays. This habit was derived from my Grandma’s teaching in those years.
Based on the current administrative division in Hong Kong, turn left from Des Voeux Road West, which is filled with a variety of dried food stores, you will see Ko Shing Street, which is the location of the famous Medicinal Street in Hong Kong. Both sides of the 300-meter street are filled with long-lasting traditional Chinese medicine stores. But in the 1960s, this street was mainly filled with dried food and rice stores. At that time, my family ran an incense store on the street with a Chinese herbal tea shop on the left and a rice store on the right. Every morning, the cries of vendors pulled up the curtain of the day in the neighborhood. On the far side of the wharf, freighters had been docked and laborers with towels on shoulders had started unloading goods from the freighters. Later, the delivery workers pulling a trolley started shuttling among big streets and small alleys. All of a sudden, the street was mingled with Chaozhou language, Hokkien dialect, Cantonese and the clatter of clogs. That was the dynamic energy of the old street and the most familiar scene in my childhood. (Stay tuned for more brilliant serials!)

Excerpts from “Six Life Lessons Grandma Taught Me”
For whole content of the book, please read “Be Bold to Make Mistakes”.


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